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Bathos vs pathos

Bathos and pathos are two literary devices that are often confused. A literary device is a tool used by speakers and writers in order to produce a certain effect by manipulating words and using them in unique and unexpected ways in poetry, prose, narrative articles and essays concerning philosophy. We will examine the differing meanings of the literary terms bathos and pathos, where they came from, and some examples of their use in sentences. Bathos a noun and a literary term that … [Read more...]

Lionize and lionise

Lionize and lionise are two spellings of the same word, which many find confusing. We will examine the definition of lionize and lionise, where these words came from, when each spelling should be used, and some examples of their use in sentences. Lionize and lionise mean to treat someone as if he were important, to hail someone as a celebrity, to bestow public approval and accolades upon someone. Synonyms for lionize and lionise that may be found in a thesaurus are idolize, revere, admire. … [Read more...]

Read the fine print and read the small print

The phrases read the fine print and read the small print are often used in a literal sense, but they have taken on an idiomatic meaning. An idiom is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal definition. Often using descriptive imagery, common idioms are words and phrases used in the English language in order to convey a concise idea, and are often spoken or are considered informal or conversational. English idioms can … [Read more...]

à la carte

The phrase à la carte is a loan word from the French. Loanwords and loan phrases are terms that have been taken from other languages and used as English words and phrases. Another term for a loanword is a borrowed word. Loanwords and loan phrases come into the English language when English speakers come into contact with other languages and cultures. When loanwords and loan phrases first enter the English language, they are used by bilingual speakers and usually maintain the original … [Read more...]

Get one’s hands dirty

Get one's hands dirty is an idiom with an uncertain origin. An idiom is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal definition. Often using descriptive imagery, common idioms are words and phrases used in the English language in order to convey a concise idea, and are often spoken or are considered informal or conversational. English idioms can illustrate emotion more quickly than a phrase that has a literal meaning, even when … [Read more...]

Feet of clay

The phrase feet of clay is an idiom that dates to the mid-1700s. An idiom is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal definition. Often using descriptive imagery, common idioms are words and phrases used in the English language in order to convey a concise idea, and are often spoken or are considered informal or conversational. English idioms can illustrate emotion more quickly than a phrase that has a literal meaning, even … [Read more...]

Dredge up and dig up

Dredge up and dig up are idioms. An idiom is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal definition. Often using descriptive imagery, common idioms are words and phrases used in the English language in order to convey a concise idea, and are often spoken or are considered informal or conversational. English idioms can illustrate emotion more quickly than a phrase that has a literal meaning, even when the etymology or origin of … [Read more...]

Jump ship

The term jump ship is an idiom that began with a literal meaning. An idiom is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal definition. Often using descriptive imagery, common idioms are words and phrases used in the English language in order to convey a concise idea, and are often spoken or are considered informal or conversational. English idioms can illustrate emotion more quickly than a phrase that has a literal meaning, even when … [Read more...]

Subject-verb agreement

Subject-verb agreement is an important part of English grammar. The concept of subject-verb agreement is simple, but complex sentences can cause confusion. We will examine the definition of subject-verb agreement, some rules that will help you construct sentences in English correctly and some examples. Subject-verb agreement means that the subject and the verb, known as the predicate verb, in a sentence must agree in number. If the subject is plural, the predicate verb must also be plural. It … [Read more...]

Take a knee

The idiom take a knee has been in use since at least the 1960s, but the meaning of the phrase has changed drastically over the years. An idiom is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal definition. Often using descriptive imagery, common idioms are words and phrases used in the English language in order to convey a concise idea, and are often spoken or are considered informal or conversational. English idioms can illustrate … [Read more...]

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